Rock Polishing Cutting Hobby - Process And Pitfalls -
 

 
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Rock Polishing Cutting Hobby - Process And Pitfalls

 
 


 
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Thumler's Tumbler Rock Tumbler MP 1 - Great Starter Tumbler

MP-1 KIT W/ACCESSORIES This Tumbler is the NEWEST product by the Thumler's Tumbler that comes with a Barrel that will hold up to 2 Lb. of stones and is GREAT for the little hobbyist or beginner and novice. Comes with the Grit packs for complete cycle of tumbling. The Rock polishing cutting hobby creates family adventure and fun.

 
 

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Choosing Stone For Your Rock Tumbler

Which stones will polish in my rock Tumbler? Knowing which stones you can polish in your rock tumbler is something important to discover when you start the hobby of polishing your stones with in a stone tumbler. You basically have two choices of sources of stones for your tumbler polisher - ones you...

 
 

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Starter Special: Kit Rock Tumbler Model A-R1

THT 102 Polish your found gems to absolute perfection with this high grade professional tumbler. Includes 3lb. capacity tumbler, one rubber barrel, kit contains Model A-R1 tumbler which has larger motor than Model T, set of 4 grades of polishing abrasives, generous supply of polishing rock, jewelry findings. 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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rock polisher tumbler


 

 
 


 
 

 Brand New Mini Vibratory Media Tumbler, Wet Dry Polisher, Finisher & CleanerRead Review Pellet Pins Stainless Steel Tumbling Media Ultra 47's - 5 Lbs with Lemi ShineRead Review Lortone 3a Tumbler - 3lb Capacity - TUM-110.00Read Review

 
 


 
 


 

 

 
 


 
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How To Use A Rotary Rock Tumbler Kit

Click here for a great rock tumbler starter kit. A standard rock tumbler kit can be found at most toy stores. This rock kit usually contains the tumbler along with some rocks, grit, and a few jewelry findings. With proper care, a good rock kit can be used over and over and can last indefinitely...

 
 

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Lapidary Rock Grinding and Polishing Kit

Lapidary rock grinding and polishing equipment for professionals

 
 

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Lapidary Equipment New 1200 X 0.1 Gram Digital LAB Scale! Weigh Rough Gems, Lapidary Slabs, Stones for Cabbing, Faceting & More! 

Shop latest DigiWeigh styles at . Free shipping and returns on qualified orders.

 
 

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Process:  Tips And Tricks

 

1.  Add a table spoon of sugar to the final polish stage for that extra gleam to your finished stones.
 
2.  Do not underfill a barrel with water, you will end up with such a thich slurry that the stones will stick together as the waste in the barrel gets denser and denser.
 
3.  Dip your stones in super glue and allow to set solid before starting out - this will fill any cracks or crevices and help prevent grits from passing onto the next phase.
 
4.  Make a note of each tumble you do - how long each phase took, what rock type was involved etc.  Experiment with the amount of grit you use at each phase an take note of the results.  This can save a lot of time in the future.  Why not try recording your efforts with something like a movie camera?
 
5.  Add some washing powder to the final polish phase, this helps the polish to glide more smoothly over the surface of the stones.
 
6.  A syringe is useful for oiling the bushes on the tumbler - you can avoid applying too much and having oil splash all over the place when you restart.
 
7.  To prevent the stones from slipping during phase 2 and 3, stick small pieces of tough rubber to the inside of the barrel, this helps to trip them as they turn and prevents flats from forming.
 
8.  Begin your tumble with rocks as near to round as possible, this is difficult to acheive but reduces the amount of wastage as you try to get that last long peice into shape!
 
9. If you are tumbling more than one barrel, make a note of the start date of each newly charged barrel, they quickly become out of step with each other and you need to know how many days have passed at each phase for each barrel.
 
10. For softer rocks, check on them on a daily basis, as they can quickly disintegrate into mud - especially during the 80 Grit phase.1.  Add a table spoon of sugar to the final polish stage for that extra gleam to your finished stones.
 
2.  Do not underfill a barrel with water, you will end up with such a thich slurry that the stones will stick together as the waste in the barrel gets denser and denser.
 
3.  Dip your stones in super glue and allow to set solid before starting out - this will fill any cracks or crevices and help prevent grits from passing onto the next phase.
 
4.  Make a note of each tumble you do - how long each phase took, what rock type was involved etc.  Experiment with the amount of grit you use at each phase an take note of the results.  This can save a lot of time in the future.  Why not try recording your efforts with something like a movie camera?
 
5.  Add some washing powder to the final polish phase, this helps the polish to glide more smoothly over the surface of the stones.
 
6.  A syringe is useful for oiling the bushes on the tumbler - you can avoid applying too much and having oil splash all over the place when you restart.
 
7.  To prevent the stones from slipping during phase 2 and 3, stick small pieces of tough rubber to the inside of the barrel, this helps to trip them as they turn and prevents flats from forming.
 
8.  Begin your tumble with rocks as near to round as possible, this is difficult to acheive but reduces the amount of wastage as you try to get that last long peice into shape!
 
9. If you are tumbling more than one barrel, make a note of the start date of each newly charged barrel, they quickly become out of step with each other and you need to know how many days have passed at each phase for each barrel.
 
10. For softer rocks, check on them on a daily basis, as they can quickly disintegrate into mud - especially during the 80 Grit phase.1.  Add a table spoon of sugar to the final polish stage for that extra gleam to your finished stones.
 
2.  Do not underfill a barrel with water, you will end up with such a thich slurry that the stones will stick together as the waste in the barrel gets denser and denser.
 
3.  Dip your stones in super glue and allow to set solid before starting out - this will fill any cracks or crevices and help prevent grits from passing onto the next phase.
 
4.  Make a note of each tumble you do - how long each phase took, what rock type was involved etc.  Experiment with the amount of grit you use at each phase an take note of the results.  This can save a lot of time in the future.  Why not try recording your efforts with something like a movie camera?
 
5.  Add some washing powder to the final polish phase, this helps the polish to glide more smoothly over the surface of the stones.
 
6.  A syringe is useful for oiling the bushes on the tumbler - you can avoid applying too much and having oil splash all over the place when you restart.
 
7.  To prevent the stones from slipping during phase 2 and 3, stick small pieces of tough rubber to the inside of the barrel, this helps to trip them as they turn and prevents flats from forming.
 
8.  Begin your tumble with rocks as near to round as possible, this is difficult to acheive but reduces the amount of wastage as you try to get that last long peice into shape!
 
9. If you are tumbling more than one barrel, make a note of the start date of each newly charged barrel, they quickly become out of step with each other and you need to know how many days have passed at each phase for each barrel.
 
10. For softer rocks, check on them on a daily basis, as they can quickly disintegrate into mud - especially during the 80 Grit phase.

1.  If you want that gleam to your finished stones; add a tablespoon of sugar to the end stage of polishing.

 

2.  Steer away for a thick slurry by not under filling the barrel with water.  You don't want your stones sticking together as the waste gets dense inside the barrel.

 

3.  Super glue dipping of stones and allowing them to set solid will fill cracks or crevices and prevent grit from contaminating the next phase.

 

4.  Catalog your tumbles, carefully tracking what rocks were used, how long it took to complete the tumble, and how much and what kind of grit you used. Take notes and videos of your process; a big time saver for the future.

 

5.  Add a little washing powder to a final rock polishing phase. It will help the polish to move over the stones more smoothly.

 

6.  Oiling the bushes on the tumbler can be done with a syringe.  This will allow for a less messy application.

 

7.  Add small pieces of tough rubber to the barrel to prevent flats from forming and stones from slipping during phases 2 and 3 of the rock tumbling process.

 

8.  Begin your process with the roundest rocks possible.  This is not always easy but will reduce waste.

 

9.  Track your barrels if you are tumbling multiples.  Take note of the start date and then you will know how many days have passed in each phase for each barrel.

 

10. If you are using softer rocks beware that you should check them on a daily basis.  the 80 Grit phase is notorious for turning soft rocks into a bunch of mud.

 

====>See more equipment reviews


 

 
 


 
 

PROFESSIONALS CORNER

Choosing Stone For Your Tumbler

Choosing Tumbling Media For Vibratory Deburring Machines

The Ordinary Bloke's Guide To Opal Polishing And Cutting

 

 

 
 


 
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PROFESSIONALS BARGAIN: (FOR NON 48 STATES) CAB King 6" Lapidary Rock Grinding Polishing Cabochon Machine 

This is a complete machine. You start out at 80 grit and finish on the polishing pad with cerium oxide at about 30,000 grit 1/4 hp, 110v, 1800 rpm, 60hz motor, A 605 GPH, 110/115 volt pump. A powerful 12 volt, single bayonet lamp. 220v 50hz model also available.

 
 

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Thumler Ultra-Vibe 18V Tumbler

Thumler Ultra Vibe 18 Industrial Vibratory Tumbler Great For Tumbling Rocks This is a new Ultra Vibe 18 vibratory tumbler It runs on 110V, 60Hz It comes with a motorized base and a annular tumbling bowl with lid Bowl capacity is 18 lbs or 6 qts 

=====> Read the craftsman reviews here

 
 

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115 V 6" Hi Tech Lapidary Trim Saw with Vise 

Our American made 6" Trim Saw is ideal for trimming facet material, opals and rock slabs of all types. The saw table has a large working area measuring 15" x 9". The durable housing is made of unbreakable cross-linked polyethylene which cannot rust. The housing and all plastic parts are guaranteed for life.

 
 

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Common Mistakes:

1.  NEVER dump your waste product from the barrels down your sink - the rock will set hard in your pipes and cause major problems. Use a large outdoor water barrel or work in your garden.

2.  NEVER use a barrel that had been previously used and contains grit if you are in the final polish phase - assign one barrel for finishing inside the final polish phase.

3.  NEVER permit grit to contaminate your tumbler, your dishwater, or your washing machine. GRIT RAPIDLY DESTROYS MECHANICAL DEVICES.

4.  NEVER leave barrels 2 days on end without keeping tabs on them in case a cover pops off or some other problem manifests in the processing.

5.  ALWAYS oil the bearings on your tumbler according to manufacturers specifications, never ignore the probability that a machine that is designed to run 24/7 will siexe up if not cared for properly.

6.  ALWAYS avoid cross-contamination of grit by using different spoons, sieves, and barrels for each kind of grit that you use in the process.

7.  ALWAYS keep your machines protected from humid air and wet working areas for safety reasons.

8.  ALWAYS place a good deal of your focus on the washing stages because your stones will never polish well to as shine if there is cross barrel contamination.

 


 

 
 


 
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Stone Fabricators' Start Kit - Cut, Profile & Polish Granite 

This kit includes everything you will need to cut slabs, profile and polish edges, drill faucet holes and cut and polish undermount sink holes. The kit offers savings of more than 10% compared to ordering them separately. This kit includes the following items: 5" Alpha Stone Cutter AWS-125. Wet Polisher VSP-120.

 
 

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